Skip to main content

More titles to consider

Loading...

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

4.3 out of 5
5 Stars
17 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
11 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
5 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
1 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
0 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • Loved it!

    The Night Portrait by Laura Morelli is Split Time Historical Fiction that revolves around a painting by Leonardo Di Vinci. When I was invited to read and review this book I hesitated for awhile. I was not familiar with the author and my pile of books to be read was high. After reading the description I was hooked and put everything else aside until I read the last word including the acknowledgments and historical information. This book has historical information about art, World War II, people, Europe and life during each time period. It is well researched with exciting incidents and conflicts that add to the real historical events. The author brings each character, event and place to life with vivid details. I’m delighted to find a new favorite author. I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. I appreciate the opportunity and thank the author and publisher for allowing me to read, enjoy and review this book. 5 Stars

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Laura Morelli’s Treasure

    The Night Portrait: A Novel of WW II and Da Vinci’s Italy, by Laura Morelli. What a delightful book this was to read! It is a story of two women separated by about 500 years. One is named Cecilia Gallerani (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cecilia...), a true to life mistress of the Regent of Milan during Renaissance Italy. The other is Edith Becker, a fictional character who is an art conservator in Germany when World War 2 begins. Cecilia was one of the favorite mistresses of the court and came from a decent background with no royal influence. She caught the eye of Ludovico Sforza, the real Regent of Milan, during a performance and their relationship grew from there. She wanted to become his wife and gain the type of future not possible before, but political realities intrude preventing her and her newborn son from realizing these dreams. Ludovico, however, did commission the remarkable Leonardo da Vinci to paint her portrait before the relationship had to end. The resulting painting was “Lady With an Ermine,” visible if you click on the above link. This much of the story is actually true. Edith is swept up, tricked, actually, into helping the Nazi government steal valuable pieces of art through conquered Europe, supposedly to protect it from the ravages of war, just to finally realize that they were en route into the private collections of high ranking leaders like Hermann Goring and Hans Frank, the Governor of occupied Poland. When she realizes her complicity in this theft, she is mortified. But how can she stop. It’s not safe to say no to the Nazis. However, it seems to me that her fictional character might well have been inspired by the real life antics of one Rose Valland, who had a similar experience during the war (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rose_Va...). The book weaves these two time lines, three, actually together: Renaissance Italy, early World War 2 as these works of art are being stolen, and late World War 2 as American troops are sweeping through Europe and a small number of them are tasked with locating, protecting, and returning these stolen pieces of art. They became known as The Monument Men. Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece is featured in all three timelines. The author, Laura Morelli, does a beautiful job of creating all three stories lines with loving care. The history described is totally plausible where it was created, and historically accurate where it was related. Furthermore, one of the American Monument Men in this story, Dominic, a budding artist himself, seems to connect with the painting in much the same way that Edith does, and in this way, helping to bring back to life, even in a small way, the life of Cecilia. I am a 71 year old man and few books can bring me to tears. But this book came close in a couple of places. The story line is that enchanting. I won this uncorrected proof free of charge from Goodreads.com. Scheduled for release to the public on September 8, 2020.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • A PAGE TURNER!

    This is one of the best books I’ve read in a long time! The Night Portrait is a dual-timeline historical novel with a deep dive into WWII and Leonardo da Vinci’s beautiful Portrait of a Lady with an Ermine. The story travels back and forth between Milan in the 1490s and Germany / Poland in the 1940s. I was captivated by the story of Cecilia, a 16-year-old beauty who becomes the Duke of Milan’s favorite mistress. Layered onto her story is the fascinating interaction between Cecilia and Leonardo da Vinci, who is called in to paint her. The WWII story centers around Edith, an art conservator who unwittingly puts the Portrait of a Lady with an Ermine in front of a high-ranking Nazi leader. Edith and others, including the Monuments Men, risk their lives to save it.  I love reading historical novels that involved famous paintings and the art world. From the first time I saw this portrait, I wondered about the strange furry creature in the girls’ lap. The Night Portrait offers some fascinating theories about this animal during the course of the story. The Night Portrait is great for readers who read the book or watched the movie about the Monuments Men. In this book, we experience the Monuments Men through the eyes of Dominic, a young husband and father who is thrust into the war when he lands on the Normandy beaches, then joins the Monuments Men in their quest to recover stolen art. The book was dense and filled with incredible details pulled from both the Italian Renaissance and WWII. However, it was an easy read, constructed with short, page-turning chapters. I flew through it and yet felt I learned so much. Highly recommended! Go pick up a copy!

    Thanks for your feedback!

    1 person found this review helpful

    1 people found this review helpful

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Awesome

    This such a great story. Totally loved it and my sister read as well

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Excellent Story of Stolen Art from WWII

    This story follows the portrait of "Lady with an Ermine" created by Leonardo da Vinci in the 1490s in Italy. This is a painting of Cecilia Gallerani, the beautiful mistress of the Duke of Milan when she was 16 years old. In the late 1930s, the painting was part of a private collection in Poland. Art conservationist Edith Becker, an expert with Italian Renaissance paintings, was reassigned from her museum job to assist Hilter's movement by compiling a dossier of old masters in Polish collections. Her list and assistance helped the Nazis take priceless pieces of art and objects. In the 1940s, Dominic Bonelli, an American soldier was told he had a new job to work with the Monuments Men to get art works back from the Nazis and return it to their owners. This WWII story is different from others as it's about the valuable pieces of stolen art and objects. The author did an incredible amount of research to create this emotional story told by four narrators which flows seamlessly. It's not necessarily one to read quickly as there is a lot to digest. In the book, Leonardo da Vinci says: "Man will always make war. But it is art and beauty, I think, that will give us something to live for." Once again, the author begs us to question: when will we learn?

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID
  • TABLETS