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Ratings and Book Reviews (3 6 star ratings
3 reviews
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4.2 out of 5
6
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    Family, Friendship, and Love

    3.5 stars The Trouble with Hating You was a good take on the enemies to lovers trope and definitely gave me Pride and Prejudice vibes at times. I was not expecting it to also deal with much more serious topics like sexual assault, death of a parent, and emotional abuse, but the author handled those very well. I really enjoyed getting more insight into Indian culture and traditions and loved that Liya and Jay were not the cookie cutter hero and heroine romance readers generally encounter. The female friendships were amazing and I loved Liya's girlfriends. They were supportive and fun and 100% loyal. I'm a sucker for first loves, so I'm hoping that Preeti will be getting a story of her own in the future. Family relationships also play a huge role in the book and I especially enjoyed Jay's family. His mother was the best and so many times I found myself cheering for her throughout the book. Unfortunately, as much as I wanted to love this book, I never truly felt hooked by it. The writing and story were enjoyable, but sometimes it seemed to lose focus. There were a lot of details and side plots going on that felt like filler and ended up distracting me from Jay and Liya's story. I also felt like the start of the book was trying to sell the hate a little too hard, and unfortunately it just made Liya and Jay unlikeable. I needed a more gradual change in their relationship too. Things seemed to go from loathing to undying love very quickly. The book wrapped up a little too neatly in the end, but overall, it was an entertaining and solid debut novel. *I voluntarily read an advance review copy of this book*
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    Great debut novel!

    Fabulous debut novel by Sajni Patel! From the cover I was expecting a fun, run of the mill rom-com. What I got was a romance with depth, flawed characters, a view of great friendships, a look into a culture that I find intriguing, some heavy issues, family dynamics - both good and bad, old customs vs. new customs, food descriptions that had me looking up recipes and drooling...plus great banter you want in a hate to love story. Liya is a little hard to like because she's a little bit on the strong, opinionated side and has no shame in telling it like it is. I ended up really liking her as the story proceeded. Jay is just lovable from the first moment you meet him. I adored him and his sweet self. His guilt over something from his past was so strong, I just wanted to give him a hug and tell him it was all ok. I was hooked on this story and read it in a day. I am looking forward to more from this author. I received an advance reader copy for an honest review.
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    Sassy, emotive, and sweetly romantic!

    The Trouble with Hating You is a fresh, heartwarming tale that transports you to Houston, Texas and into the lives of Liya Thakkar, an assertive, independent, Indian-American woman who is more than happy being single and is completely uninterested in any of her parent’s matchmaking abilities, and Jay Shah, a persistent, handsome, young man who takes his family obligations very seriously and is not easily persuaded. The writing is heartfelt and light. The characters are intelligent, stubborn, vulnerable, and endearing. And the plot is a push-pull tale full of familial responsibility, workplace drama, tender moments, hilarious mishaps, witty banter, goals, expectations, friendship, community, optimism, chemistry, and love. Overall, The Trouble with Hating You is so much more than a typical rom-com with lots of culture and tradition, weighty, hard-hitting issues, and an enemies-to-lovers romance that skirts it all. It is a fantastic debut for Patel and I can’t wait to read what she comes up with next.
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