Skip to main content

Recommended For You

Loading...

Shopping Cart

You're getting the VIP treatment!

Item(s) unavailable for purchase
Please review your cart. You can remove the unavailable item(s) now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout.
itemsitem
itemsitem

Ratings and Book Reviews ()

Overall rating

5.0 out of 5
5 Stars
3 reviews have 5 stars
4 Stars
0 reviews have 4 stars
3 Stars
0 reviews have 3 stars
2 Stars
0 reviews have 2 stars
1 Star
0 reviews have 1 stars

Share your thoughts

You've already shared your review for this item. Thanks!

We are currently reviewing your submission. Thanks!

Complete your review

All Book Reviews

  • Beautifully written

    Reviewed by Christian Sia for Readers' Favorite Through Forests and Mountains by Margaret Walker is a military novel with strong historical underpinnings. Set in Yugoslavia in 1941, the story follows Anton Marković, a submarine captain in the Yugoslav navy, after a propeller accident leaves him crippled and left behind as the German and Italian armies attack. He suffers an infection and nearly dies, and joins the Montenegrin partisan group where he meets Mara, the daughter of the Yugoslav ambassador to Britain. He is attracted to her, but she isn’t easy to get. She is a woman whose heart longs for someone else. She likes Tito and has a possessive ex-boyfriend who is hunting her. As the group moves from place to place, Anton is keen on Mara who doesn’t pay him much attention, but when she disappears, Anton can’t stand the thought of losing her. Together with Nikola, they set out to find her. What happens next is a face to face confrontation with Miroslav. But who will have Mara? Anton is a character that I liked. An awkward man who is more connected to machines than to people and who feels a strong attraction for a woman after suffering a tragedy at war. I was very keen to see what will become of him and Mara. The romance is beautifully well written and I loved the way the author writes about the emotions of the characters. The suspense is strong and it allows the reader to follow the characters as they evolve through difficult situations. The story is beautifully told and the themes of war, love, patriotism, and friendship are well developed. Margaret Walker has a unique gift for setting and the historical elements of the setting are intelligently crafted, allowing readers a feel of WWII while exploring the politics of the war at the time. Through Forests and Mountains is an adventure in wartime and a story that captures the austerity of life during the German and Italian invasion. It features strong characters and a love story that progresses to a delightful final scene.

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • Highly recommend!

    It’s 1942 and fascism is sweeping through Europe like the plague. Many strong men have gone off to war, leaving farmers and women to fend for themselves. Mara is one of those women and she is thrilled when she is allowed to fight back, with a weapon no less. When she meets Anton, she’s not sure what to make of his scowl. He’s got a bullet wound in the head but maybe it is more than that. As they travel through the forests and mountains in Yugoslavia, one thing is certain: death to fascism by any means necessary. Through Forests and Mountains is a riveting tale of World War II not often told. The Germans were unstoppable until Tito in Yugoslavia came up with a brilliant plan. Margaret Walker takes us inside one of the most successful resistance groups who thwarted the Nazis at every turn. While this is historical fiction, Through Forests and Mountains reads like a World War II memoir. Everything from the setting to the beautiful descriptive narration to the characters adds immense enjoyment to the story. The stark contrast between Anton and Mara sets the tone for the book. The plot moves at a good pace. Margaret Walker must have done a lot of research and it shines in Through Forests and Mountains. I learned quite a bit from reading and look forward to reading more from Margaret Walker. If you’re a historical fiction reader, you’ll quite enjoy Through Forests and Mountains. If you’re looking for a fresh viewpoint on World War II, pick up Through Forests and Mountains. Highly recommend! Disclaimer: I received a copy from the author in the hopes I'd review it. My Rating: 5 stars

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

  • 6 stars. A heroic story, gorgeous writing

    Captain Anton Marković is recuperating in hospital, his arm shattered by the propellers of his torpedo boat, the Nebojša. Mara leaves the ambassador’s mansion in a pique; she wants to return to Belgrade. Her father the ambassador says, ‘find the boyfriend’, Miroslav. ‘He’ll be able to find her’. Miroslav finds Mara, but she wants nothing to do with him, his possessiveness and his Croatian fascist politics. She has listened to a talk by Tito, and she’s impressed. She attends a meeting of communist women and joins a 10-day barefoot march to Drvar in Bosnia, along the way receiving harsh lessons in the plight of the proletariat. The communist women ask Mara to take a position teaching in liberated Užice, and though she had hoped for ‘more epic’ work, she is happy. Anton takes to the mountains with Montenegrin chieftain, Nikola Mugoša, and two of Mugoša’s sons. With the Germans occupied with invading Russia, when Italy claims Montenegro, the Yugoslav uprising takes them by surprise. Belgrade is Judenfrei, and they are looking for ways to execute more untermenschen like Serbs and Slavs. Mara takes up with a British spy, Mr Hudson codenamed ‘Marko’, but they are accosted by her Croatian stalker Miroslav, and he threatens her. He breaks in to Hudson’s flat and steals his codebooks. Mara ends up with Anton’s party and other refugees, all the while stalked by Miroslav. The writing is beautiful, unclichéd, in places funny, filled with gorgeous phrases like ‘his night’s morphine flashing from her syringe’, ‘the priest’s…towering black presence filled the outhouse with authority’, ‘he woke up bathed in the scent of finer things that lingered through shaving and breakfast’ and ‘she farewelled the city as the dawn cast amber ripples across its traumatised buildings’. The pronouncements of the partisans on the two extreme ends of the political spectrum, communists and fascists, are credible; this evidences the author’s understanding of both and is something that is hard to do. The scene where Mara first encounters the villagers of Drvar is astounding! We learn the complicated history of wartime Yugoslavia, fed bit by bit into the dialogue. This is very artful. Despite the complexity of the history, the plot is not too complex to follow, and time is taken to appreciate the horrors of war. Death to fascism; freedom to the people!

    Thanks for your feedback!

    0 person found this review helpful

    0 people found this review helpful

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices:

  • DESKTOP
  • eREADERS
  • TABLETS
  • IOS
  • ANDROID