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Ratings and Book Reviews (2 3 star ratings
2 reviews
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4.3 out of 5
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    Okay novel, but important message

    The concept of this book is really powerful and really terrifying. This could actually happen. Like, so many awful things are already happening that it is actually possible it could go as far as it does in this book. And that’s horrible. I think everyone could read this book and take something away from it. Maybe it will open your eyes. Maybe it will encourage you to do something. Or maybe it will simply make you think a little differently. Dystopian societies aren’t just fiction, as much as we like to believe they are. In order to actually review this book, I’m going to forget for a minute that it reflects current/possible future happenings. The captivity factor was mostly good, but there were times where I would skim or just not be super into it. The story was quite good and definitely had an intriguing concept. The characters could have maybe benefitted from a bit more development. Or something was just a bit off. I wasn’t able to connect with Layla as much as I would have liked and I think that affected how captivated I was by the book as a whole. As a fictional novel, it was just okay. But I still think it’s an important message and everyone would benefit from reading it.
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    Internment

    Internment is very scary look into a near future reality that seems to be knocking on our door right now. When politicians vilinize the Muslim community, people begin to view them all with suspicion. A registry is formed. They lose their jobs/schools. And they are sent to camps. Samira Ahmed does an amazing job showing just how the American public allowed this to happen. Between a mixture of hatred, being uninformed, and people assuming it could never happen here - they allowed it to happen. We see these events unfold through the eyes of Layal - an American whose country turns on her for committing no crime. Viewing the life of the camp and the small rebellions leading to revolution as she experiences them was so very hard. I think this book comes at a great time in history to show that "not doing anything" isn't any better than "doing the bad thing." Looking the other way or assuming that it can't happen here is a faulty way of thinking/acting, and Samira Ahmed shows us why. I alternated between anger at what people dared to do and sadness that anyone would be treated in this way. Thank goodness it's fiction....for now. I only hope that continues to be the case and we never have to see events like the ones in Internment ever happen. **I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book**
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